How can therapists make progress ?

10 03 2014

image

K. Anders Ericsson’s work on deliberate practice and client feedback explains studies showing that most of us grow continually in confidence over the course of our careers despite little or no improvement in our actual rate of success.

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the culprit behind such mistaken self-assessment isn’t incompetence, but rather proficiency. Within weeks and months of first starting out, noticeable mistakes in everyday professional activities become increasingly rare, making intentional modifications seem irrelevant, increasingly difficult, and costly in terms of time and resources. Add to this the custom in our profession of conflating success with a particular method or technique, and the door to greatness for many therapists is slammed shut early on.

During the last few decades, more than 10,000 “how-to” books on psychotherapy have been published, and the number of treatment approaches has mushroomed. Based on this information alone, one would be hard pressed not to believe that real progress has been made by the field. More than ever before, we know what works for whom. Or do we?

Discover the characteristics of the most successful therapists, and what we can learn from them to improve our own practices. Download The Secrets of Supershrinks: Pathways to Clinical Excellence for FREE!

In comparing today’s success rates with those of decades past, we find that  no measurable improvement in the therapeutic effectiveness of psychotherapy has occurred in the last 30 years.

The time has come to confront the unpleasant truth: Our tried-and-true strategies for improving our therapeutic effectiveness have failed. Instead of advancing in the field, we’ve stagnated, mistaking our feverish peddling on a stationary bike for progress in the Tour de Therapy.

This isn’t to say that therapy is ineffective. Quite the contrary, the data are clear and unequivocal: Psychotherapy works. The heart of the issue, however, is how we can learn from our experiences and improve our therapeutic effectiveness.

Psychotherapists aren’t alone in the struggle to increase expertise. Using the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) as an example, science writer Atul Gawande showed how the same processes undermining excellence in psychotherapy play out in medicine.

Since 1964, medical researchers have been tracking the outcomes of patients with CF. As is the case with psychotherapy, the evidence indicates that standard CF treatment works. The real story isn’t that patients with CF live longer when treated, but that, as with psychotherapy, treatment success rates vary significantly.

It’s a small comfort to know that our counterparts in medicine stumble and fall in the pursuit of excellence just as much as we “soft-headed” psychotherapists do. But Gawande’s article provides much more than an opportunity to commiserate. It confirms what our own research revealed to be the essential first step in improving outcomes: knowing your baseline performance. To get where you want to go, you first have to know where you are.

Most practicing psychotherapists have no hard data on their therapeutic effectiveness with clients. Fewer still have any idea how their outcomes compare to those of other clinicians or to national norms. By discovering this information, we can push beyond our current standard of reliable performance and, in time, see our outcomes improve markedly.





My life as a psychologist

18 01 2014

 I work as a psychologist and really want to do something for people out there. That is the reason that I started a blog with the purpose of spreading important information about psychology to others. You`ll find it by following this link

behind the mirror

Mirrorgirl

m6

mir mirror1

I like meeting new people. Feel free to contact me with feedback or with your story. The meaning of life is being with people, listening to their stories and learning something new from it. Always appreciate your own story; There`ll never be a story completely the same as yours!You`ll find me at these social networks:

 And now: I want to know more about YOU:

What I write about:

arts & entertainment  books childhood clinical  humans Inspiration life lifestyle  psychologist depression

 dissociation emotions Freedom Germany happiness history hope love me mental health music myself 

Norway people personal Personality psychotherapy relationships sleep sorrow thinking travel  work writing 2013

Follow me On facebook





From the therapist office: Tips for a healing journal

18 06 2013

What do you think about this? The list is a bit long, but that gives the opportunity for picking your own favorites!

By Garrett Coan –

As a therapist, I often suggest to clients that they explore their feelings and thoughts by keeping a journal. Sometimes clients ask for a bit of direction with this process. Here are some journaling ideas if you’re not sure where to start:

1. Write down what happened today and how you felt about it.
2. Write a letter to a person you are angry with. Say everything you are feeling and wish you had the nerve to say.
3. Draw a picture of the person you wrote the letter to in #2.
4. Make a list of all the things you are grateful for. List all the big things, all the small things, and everything in between that you can think of.
5. Circle the three most important things on the list you made in #4. Write a paragraph for each, expressing your appreciation to the person who had the most influence over it. If possible, turn this into an actual letter and send it.
6. Make a list of the things that you feel upset about right now. Write down as many as you can think of until you can’t think of any more. Then choose the top five.
7. For each of the top five things you identified in #6, list 10 things you can do to gain control of the situation. Circle the top three from each list.
8. Make a timeline that represents your life. Fill it in with the most significant events that have shaped you: your early years, your teen years, and each decade that has followed. Draw pictures or icons next to the most important events. Use crayons or markers if you wish.
9. Write a few pages about your feelings about the timeline.
10. Describe how your life would be different if had or had not happened.
Here are some examples:
a. If your parents had divorced
b. If your parents had remained married

back-to-the-future.jpg

what if your parents hadn`t met ?
(from back to the future)

c. If your parents had been married

d. If your mother hadn’t passed away
e. If you hadn’t moved to
f. If you had gone to college
g. If you hadn’t gone to college
h. If you had gone to College
i. If you had never met
j. If you hadn’t broken up with
11. Make a list of all the things you wish you could do before your life is over.
12. Make a list of the things no one knows about you.
13. Write about your junior year in high school.
14. Write about what life was like before you became a parent.

 

very-funny-and-naughty-kids-you-never-seen-before-40-pictures.jpg

some long for the time before children..

15. Write about what you wish you had known before you became a parent.
16. Make a list of the things you still want to learn about being a parent.
17. Describe what it was like when you first met your partner.
18. Write about what you wish you had known about your partner before you married him/her.
19. Write about what you wish your partner had known about you before (s)he married you.
20. Write a letter to yourself as you were at age 10. Tell yourself:
a. What your life is like now
b. What you have learned since you were 10

0b5a198c537bad34d5e94c9a4f0aebe1.jpg

what one can learn as a child!

c. What you want him or her to know
d. What you want him or her to beware of
e. What you want him or her to enjoy every moment of
21. Write a letter to your own parents. Tell them what your life is like now.
22. Write a letter to someone from your childhood or adolescence who didn’t appreciate you or who misunderstood you. Tell the person what you want them to know and how you feel about the lack of connection between you.
23. Think of someone you never acknowledged for something important. Write that person a letter and acknowledge him or her.
24. Think of someone who never acknowledged you for something important. Write them a letter and tell them what you want them to know.

IMG_0448.jpg

25. Make a list of five miracles you want to happen in the coming year. Write a paragraph or two describing each one and how your life will be better if it happens.
26. For each of the five miracles, make a list of:
a. Five barriers or forces that block or prevent it from happening
b. Five positive influences, things that encourage or support its happening
c. Five things you can do to reduce the barriers and strengthen the positive influences
27. Write about the five things you most like to do.
28. Write about the five things you most dislike doing.
29. Make a list of five places you’d like to visit. Describe what you imagine them to be like.
30. Write about three things you most regret doing or not doing. Describe what happened and how you feel about it.

early-graduation-gift-for-baby.html.jpg

what would you like to tell your children?

   31. Write a letter to your children, even if they have not yet been born. Tell them what you want them to know about you.

32. Write a letter to your grandchildren, even if they have not yet been born. Tell them what you want them to know about you.

33. Write a letter to your descendants one hundred years from now. Describe what your life is like today.
Garrett Coan, MSW, LCSW is Founder and Director of the Center for Creative Counseling, a team of expert and licensed therapists and coaches providing phone and internet counseling services to clients throughout the United States and worldwide.

A full library of articles from this author are available at

 

half-birthday-interview.html.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[http://www.stressmanagementboutique.com/Article_Library.html]

 

And some other ideas for your journal:

 

journaling-tips-printable-journaling-cards.html.jpg

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Garrett_Coan

http://EzineArticles.com/?Use-a-Journal-For-Self-Discovery-and-Self-Expression&id=10254








Solace

Your inner health with Jason Lee

discoveringsooz

I refuse to be fat forever

Logical Quotes

Logical and Inspirational Quotes

jennifersekella

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

MAKE ME UP MARIE

An authentic lifestyle blog and open journal | Written by Marie Penrose

raynotbradbury

We are cups, constantly being filled. The trick is, knowing how to tip ourselves over and let the beautiful stuff out.

Oriana's Notes

Just some stuff you might like. Or not. What do I know about you.

Child of Cynicism

"We're just two lost souls swimming in a fishbowl year after year."

Eric's Corner of the Globe

Within the confines of one's mind lay the keys to eternity

Musings of PuppyDoc

Poetry & Medicine

Invisible Illnesses

Awareness, Education, Research & Quips

aspergerinformator

en opplysningsblogg om Asperger syndrom

Captain Awkward

Advice. Staircase Wit. Faux Pas. Movies.

Emerging From The Dark Night

Working through the Dark Night of the Soul to emerge as me.

The Word Forge

Casting truth, melting down golden calves

Psychotherapy with Linda

let go or be dragged

A Bipolars Reality

Where Being Bipolar is Real

I Am My Own Island

Because We all need to find a way to live with ourselves

seasonsofapril

Professional, music lover. Quirky by nature, bipolar warrior, inside dancer & life ponderer. Trying to find the joy in the every day.

A Word Of Substance

"Object Relations"

Solace

Your inner health with Jason Lee

discoveringsooz

I refuse to be fat forever

Logical Quotes

Logical and Inspirational Quotes

jennifersekella

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

MAKE ME UP MARIE

An authentic lifestyle blog and open journal | Written by Marie Penrose

raynotbradbury

We are cups, constantly being filled. The trick is, knowing how to tip ourselves over and let the beautiful stuff out.

Oriana's Notes

Just some stuff you might like. Or not. What do I know about you.

Child of Cynicism

"We're just two lost souls swimming in a fishbowl year after year."

Eric's Corner of the Globe

Within the confines of one's mind lay the keys to eternity

Musings of PuppyDoc

Poetry & Medicine

Invisible Illnesses

Awareness, Education, Research & Quips

aspergerinformator

en opplysningsblogg om Asperger syndrom

Captain Awkward

Advice. Staircase Wit. Faux Pas. Movies.

Emerging From The Dark Night

Working through the Dark Night of the Soul to emerge as me.

The Word Forge

Casting truth, melting down golden calves

Psychotherapy with Linda

let go or be dragged

A Bipolars Reality

Where Being Bipolar is Real

I Am My Own Island

Because We all need to find a way to live with ourselves

seasonsofapril

Professional, music lover. Quirky by nature, bipolar warrior, inside dancer & life ponderer. Trying to find the joy in the every day.

A Word Of Substance

"Object Relations"